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Paddy learned to speak Mandarin and served in the SBS and Intelligence before entering Parliament and leading the Lib Dems for 11 years. He then served as the UN High Representative for Bosnia Herzegovina. In speeches he discusses the implications of a new multi-polar global power structure. As the first MP to have a computer in Westminster, he calls for faster, more responsive politics and the need to rebuild after May 7th.

Alongside his American academic appointment, the former MPC member is Economics Editor of the New Statesman. Danny has warned that opposition to austerity isn’t enough without an alternative policy: Labour needs to “get real, understand that markets work, and learn fast.” As a specialist in ‘the everyday economics of people’ Danny focuses on real data, instead of forecasts.

Roger is a former HSBC Chief Economist and winner of the Wolfson Prize for his study on how a country would leave the Euro. In the revised 2017 edition of The Trouble With Europe he considers how to make Brexit a success and how to reform the EU. Speaking without hyperbole, Roger weighs up the arguments for ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ outcomes, explores how trading relationships might work and considers the concerns of key industries and the implications for Scotland.

The News at Ten anchor also served a ITV’s Political Editor. In a career that’s taken Tom from civil strife to Whitehall to royal palaces, he has an insight both entertaining and informative on the key events and players in national and international affairs.

Alastair ran Labour’s communications for ten years, in and out of government. He now advises on both political and organisational strategy. He’s written a slew of books including Winners, drawing inspiration from high achievers in sport, business and politics. In presentations Alastair explains what to do when you come under pressure: “Challenge your basic assumptions, put yourselves in your opponent’s shoes, devise a tight plan from the centre... and then pursue it with aggression.”

Ken has served every Conservative Government from Heath to Cameron, laying foundations for growth as Chancellor under John Major. He argues that the big global problems are deficit and debt, which have to be addressed. In the meantime Eurozone prospects are good; the politics around cheap oil (and how we handle the various players) matter far more than the economics; and President Xi will stick to his five year plan – but China must lift restrictions to flourish.

As a Cabinet Minister Charles dealt with numerous contentious issues from counter-terrorism measures to student tuition fees. He now lectures on politics. In speeches Charles shows how some problems seem insoluble unless you collaborate (or gain cross-party support). As he argues in The Too Difficult Box, the only way to make effective long term decisions is to remove them from short term political necessities – and agree not to attack one another.

Nick rode a wave of popular support, becoming the first Liberal Democrat to achieve high office. To the surprise of sceptics the Coalition lasted the full term, before taking its toll on the party. He’s since written Between The Extremes, exploring how populism has affected those in power and arguing for the need to reclaim the centre ground. Unashamedly pro-EU, he believes British voters should make the final decision on Brexit after the ‘Rubik’s cube’ of negotiations.

Since revealing the illusions behind the crash and its ramifications in Paper Promises, Philip has published a new edition of Money Machine – with an overview of the London markets. In speeches Philip weighs up the outlook for equities, bonds and currencies. What does Brexit and the rise in protest parties tell us about the future for globalisation? And given low rates, what are the consequences for insurance companies and pension funds?

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