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As Zopa co-Founder and CEO, James was a pioneer in peer-to-peer lending. Putting those with a small amount to invest in front of reliable borrowers has proved a successful business model, creating what is now globally £100bn sector. James is now helping organisation make more informed strategic choices as part of FutureAgenda.org, the world’s largest open foresight programme. In presentations he examines disruption across a range of industries and considers how long-established organisations can drive innovation and be better prepared for the future.

A career ad man, Kevin Allen was notable for leading the pitch on the famous Mastercard ‘Priceless’ campaign. His account skills have been applied as Director of Global Accounts and Chief Growth Officer for some of the world’s biggest ad agencies. He now looks at how companies can grow, where the opportunities lie, and how great leadership inspires the greatest asset - the workforce.

After spells at BA and Thomas Cook, Tony was the third employee to join easyJet. He was central in steering it from ambitious start-up to the biggest single airline in Europe. It now flies twice as many passengers as BA. Tony still works with Stelios on projects like peer-to-peer car rental. In speeches he tells the inside story, including brand extensions that didn’t quite go to plan: “It certainly helps to be in the right place at the right time, but anything is possible providing you avoid complacency.”

Seven years ago guerrilla marketing helped James successfully launch Gü, taking on entrenched competition. The company has kept on growing, introducing new lines and winning an Exporter of the Year award in 2008 for their sales in France. James acknowledges that decisions now have to focus more around cash flow, but he also sees it as essential to take risks. He has confidence in the resilience of his product as an ‘affordable treat’, and believes exchange rates offer significant opportunities.

It all started with one ice-cream van for the hard-hitting dragon from Glasgow and he’s been whipping companies into shape ever since. Now Duncan owns hotels, health clubs and bars. He motivates budding entrepreneurs with his rags to riches story.

Simon has developed software that connects print buyers to expensive presses across the country that are sitting idle at their time of need. Seeing himself as an ‘open and honest rule-breaker’, he has already grown the start-up into a £30m turnover enterprise. Simon puts their success down to recruiting the best talent they can find and sharing the rewards. Each ‘webmarteer’ then receives as much training and mentoring as they want – and the chance to teach at the firm’s school in Ethiopia.

As a self-taught chef Raymond worked day and night to achieve his dream - first excelling as a waiter to get his foot on the ladder. He has kept up the same passion as Chef Patron of Belmond Le Manoir auxQuat’Saisons, advisor to supermarkets and airlines and driving force behind The Restaurant TV series. He believes that everyone is trainable and that every manager has to plan. ‘You cannot succeed by doing things on the wing – or if you fail to deliver the values you promise.’

Daniel launched in-game advertising and developed bestselling video games before founding the online fashion company’s venture capital division. Scouring the world for innovations, he assembled a network of FashionTech talent and forged partnerships across marketing, production and imagery. In presentations Daniel considers the demand for instant experiences and relationships, how every business is becoming a tech business, and how to find and grow talent.

Rachel Botsman writes and talks about the power of collaboration and network technologies; she argues that it might have a bigger impact on our lives than the Industrial Revolution. New markets have opened up with ‘mass online democratisation,’ but with data at the centre it brings a risk of power merely moving from banks to web giants. Rachel explains why every industry must adapt to service networking, and why we all need to own our own data.

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