Anthony Lilley OBE

Anthony Lilley OBE

Technology and Media Expert

Synopsis

Having worked on diverse projects including interactive TV for the BBC, games for PlayStation, events for the Royal Opera House, and with companies including Camelot, Google and Procter and Gamble, Anthony has a unique view on technological disruption in a variety of industries. However he advises caution in assuming all problems can be solved with data and technology and provides a pragmatic look at how things might change.

Biography

Anthony Lilley is a media producer, businessman and technology expert who has worked on many of the cutting edge developments in television, live events and broader business.

In a diverse career, Anthony has witnessed first-hand the effects of technology on a range of industries, and has been involved in shaping many of them. Starting out in TV, he saw huge disruption within the media and was closely involved in the production and development of everything from interactive TV programmes to red button and on-demand platforms. He’s also worked with the BBC on a range of online projects aimed at leading, not just meeting viewer expectations.

Headhunted by lottery operator Camelot, Anthony was tasked with looking at how a heavily regulated sector can deal with potentially huge shifts and bridging the divide between rapid developments in consumer technology with the longer timeframes of regulation and legislation. He also worked with Ofcom, the Department of Culture, Media, and Sport, and the Gambling Commission on addressing regulatory and legal issues.

More broadly Anthony looks at what technology is doing to organisations, society and individuals. He considers the attention paid to data and its application. He views the use of data by many as like driving; focusing on data as the solution to all questions is like driving only by looking in the rear view mirror - useful, but not the whole story.

Describing himself as a ‘positive sceptic’ and ‘an early adopter with a bin-full of old gadgets’ Anthony looks at what the future holds and why not everything will necessarily change. With examples of how industries and businesses have adapted (both successfully and unsuccessfully) to changes in technology, environment and consumer expectations, he also addresses ‘the death of digital’ – it’s a part of the world, our lives, and business strategy – it’s no longer new, engendering fear or excitement, but normal. The question now is what you do with it.

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