In-Out, In-Out, Shake it All About: a guide to conference speakers on the Referendum.

Now that London has a new mayor (I’ll be honest, we weren’t asked for many conference speakers on that particular bun fight), all eyes have turned to the EU Referendum. What is the likely impact of Brexit on the job market, Britain’s trading prospects, economic growth and, indeed, the conference speakers circuit? Will it take years to renegotiate our relationships with our European neighbours? Will Boris run away with the vote and be the next man into Number 10 or will he be re-joining the conference speakers circuit in the foreseeable future?

We have conference speakers aplenty, lined up to take sides, or objectively to explain to businesses what might happen should Brexit become a reality, rather than a mysterious semi-inexplicable concept. JLA has booked panels to debate for and against, and solo conference speakers giving their opinion or an overview of the possible consequences.

Here is a selection of the more influential / outspoken conference speakers on Brexit, some of whom can be seen at our next breakfast – the morning of the 24th May at the Regent Street Cinema.

Lord (Digby) Jones:

Described as the ‘face of British Business’ Digby is an ambassador for UK Trade & Investment and has been vocal about his reasons for voting ‘Leave.’ He explains why we’re better off out, and why the 21st century belongs to Asia, not Europe.

Lord (Daniel) Finkelstein:

Associate Editor of The Times and a close advisor to the Conservative Party with the ear of George Osborne, Danny is one of those rare conference speakers, equally comfortable as a keynote speaker or in an evening slot.

 Vicky Pryce:

A Greek-born economist and Chief Economic Advisor to CEBR, Vicky is an expert on the Eurozone and looks ahead to Britain’s role within it, whether a member or not.

Trevor Phillips:

Former Chair of the Equality & Human Rights Commission, Trevor now serves as President of the John Lewis Partnership Council. He might explain what the European Convention on Human Rights has done for the UK, and why Theresa May might want us to abandon it, despite calling for the UK to remain in the EU.

Roger Bootle:

One of the ‘Seven Wise Men’ under Chancellor Ken Clarke, Roger won the Wolfson Economics Prize for the best plan for dealing with member states leaving the Eurozone – something that hasn’t yet been put to the test!

Ken Clarke:

A noted Tory Europhile, Ken was Chancellor under John Major and, as Tory whip, was instrumental in ensuring that Heath’s government won key votes on entry to the European Economic Community (now the EU) in 1975.

Douglas Alexander:

The former Home Secretary who lost his seat to the SNP in the 2015 election is an advisor to Pinsent Masons, specifically on Brexit. He is a Senior Fellow at Harvard’s School of Government and a member of the European Council of Foreign Relations.

Stephane Garelli:

Providing the view from across the Channel, Prof. Garelli is an expert on competitiveness and globalisation. He provides an insight into how companies and countries compete in global markets.

Robert Peston:

The former BBC Business Editor has taken up his post at ITV to grill the main players in the run-up to the election on June 23rd.

John Pienaar:

The BBC’s new Deputy Political Editor provides an overview of the various scenarios that might play out after the Referendum, and the consequences for Britain, its main parties and Europe as a whole.

 

 

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