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Paddy learned to speak Mandarin and served in the SBS and Intelligence before entering Parliament and leading the Lib Dems for 11 years. He then served as the UN High Representative for Bosnia Herzegovina. In speeches he discusses the implications of a new multi-polar global power structure. As the first MP to have a computer in Westminster, he calls for faster, more responsive politics and the need to rebuild after May 7th.

Gerald worked in international finance in London, Hong Kong and Switzerland. He has since published The Tangled World and Two Speed World, exploring the impact of both explosive and gradual change. In presentations he shows how we misunderstand risks and have too narrow a view of models and decision making. With no perfect solutions and many ‘known unknowns’, we are often influenced by context and instinctive biases rather than rational analysis.

Dave specialises in electronic payment technology and digital money, including online and mobile. In presentations he weighs up perceptions and looks at the pitfalls of the death of money – especially digital security. With M2M transactions commonplace, Dave accepts that proof of identity is key to new payment systems, but what are the implications if identity itself becomes a commodity? What opportunities might a cashless society uncover?

Ian Blair introduced structural reforms in the Met’s 53,000-strong workforce, and led the police service in the wake of the London bombings. He considers a range of threats (from Internet crime to foreign and home-grown terrorism, corruption and drug abuse), and examines the corresponding risk registers. On a different note Ian also analyses crisis management, from 7/7 to Deepwater Horizon, and the challenge of dealing with ‘difficult’ people.

As Home Secretary David was in charge of security, immigration and policing. He is now Chairman of a multi-Academy Trust and an advisor to easyJet. As well as sharing insights on cyber-crime and crisis management, David considers how leaders can best engage with the public and counter the widespread sense of grievance. He argues for business to take a lead: “You are a part of our communities, not just employers of people with certain skills.” After dinner he takes a lighter look at a life in politics - both highs and lows – from The Queen offering to cut up his meal, to Sarkozy claiming to have intercepted his emails.

The BBC’s Middle East Editor has filed reports from 70 countries, co-presented breakfast TV and hosted Have I Got News for You. He now covers developments as they unfold across a volatile region and also looks at the motivation and the lighter side of broadcasting in the middle of conflict – including how he dodged bullets in Bosnia by falling asleep in a blackberry bush.

Stephen advises African ministers, big corporations, peacekeepers and British and Chinese governments on Africa. While several of the continent’s 54 states have shown increases in GDP, investment still carries many dangers. Stephen highlights risks and benefits, compares investment models, warns against tailored democracies, assesses infrastructure issues and looks at the new generation of entrepreneurs. He reveals surprises in places like Angola.

Ken has served every Conservative Government from Heath to Cameron, laying foundations for growth as Chancellor under John Major. He argues that the big global problems are deficit and debt, which have to be addressed. In the meantime Eurozone prospects are good; the politics around cheap oil (and how we handle the various players) matter far more than the economics; and President Xi will stick to his five year plan – but China must lift restrictions to flourish.

As a Cabinet Minister Charles dealt with numerous contentious issues from counter-terrorism measures to student tuition fees. He now lectures on politics. In speeches Charles shows how some problems seem insoluble unless you collaborate (or gain cross-party support). As he argues in The Too Difficult Box, the only way to make effective long term decisions is to remove them from short term political necessities – and agree not to attack one another.

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