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As Transport Secretary, Schools Minister and Head of the No.10 Policy Unit, Andrew has been an architect of public service reforms from academies to policing. He also prepared the plan for HS2, before leading a review of regional growth strategies. As Chair of the new commission, he is now assessing the UK’s future infrastructure needs. In presentations Andrew looks at change management and policy implementation in complex organisations – and difficult conditions.

Paddy learned to speak Mandarin and served in the SBS and Intelligence before entering Parliament and leading the Lib Dems for 11 years. He then served as the UN High Representative for Bosnia Herzegovina. In speeches he discusses the implications of a new multi-polar global power structure. As the first MP to have a computer in Westminster, he calls for faster, more responsive politics and the need to rebuild after May 7th.

Before Aznar took office, Spain had low growth and widescale unemployment. He liberalised the market, privatised industry, increased GDP by 68% and made it the world’s eighth largest economy. Now, as many European countries struggle with sovereign debt, he shares strategies for revival. Aznar considers options for Europe, consequences for business and potential ramifications in the developing world – especially in those countries trying to build stability.

Once UN High Representative in Bosnia, Bildt challenges Europe and the US to find a common vision to meet the threat to world order. Now that we are endangered by weak states and shadowy structures, how can we prevent a clash between fundamentalists and reformers within a civilisation becoming one between civilisations?

Ian Blair introduced structural reforms in the Met’s 53,000-strong workforce, and led the police service in the wake of the London bombings. He considers a range of threats (from Internet crime to foreign and home-grown terrorism, corruption and drug abuse), and examines the corresponding risk registers. On a different note Ian also analyses crisis management, from 7/7 to Deepwater Horizon, and the challenge of dealing with ‘difficult’ people.

As Home Secretary David was in charge of security, immigration and policing. He is now Chairman of a multi-Academy Trust and an advisor to easyJet. As well as sharing insights on cyber-crime and crisis management, David considers how leaders can best engage with the public and counter the widespread sense of grievance. He argues for business to take a lead: “You are a part of our communities, not just employers of people with certain skills.” After dinner he takes a lighter look at a life in politics - both highs and lows – from The Queen offering to cut up his meal, to Sarkozy claiming to have intercepted his emails.

Alastair ran Labour’s communications for ten years. He now advises on both political and organisational strategy. He’s also written a slew of books including Winners, drawing inspiration from high achievers in sport, business and politics. In presentations Alastair explains what to do when you come under pressure: “Challenge your basic assumptions, put yourselves in your opponent’s shoes, devise a tight plan from the centre... and then pursue it with aggression.”

As a Cabinet Minister Charles dealt with numerous contentious issues from counter-terrorism measures to student tuition fees. He now lectures on politics. In speeches Charles shows how some problems seem insoluble unless you collaborate (or gain cross-party support). As he argues in The Too Difficult Box, the only way to make effective long term decisions is to remove them from short term political necessities – and agree not to attack one another.

Philip was once a top ranked equity strategist and a teacher - before becoming Blair’s chief speechwriter. They left No.10 on the same day. Now at The Times, Philip weighs up the personalities, compromises and agenda of the leading players; he also uncovers the secrets of the daily editorial meeting.

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