Alan Mitchell

Alan Mitchell

Strategy Director

Synopsis

The author of The New Bottom Line and former Marketing Magazine editor examines the sea change when power shifts from producer to consumer. As today’s customers change the way they want to deal with organisations including how they shop and how they use information, there’s a need to rethink how to create new data-sharing relationships that create value for both parties. What are customers saying, and what can we do with it? With Search the dominant mode of information, how can brands follow the searcher’s agenda?

Biography

Alan is a leading commentator on marketing and consumers and is the author of Right Side Up: Building Brands in the Age of the Organised Consumer and The New Bottom Line. He is strategic advisor to the UK Government’s midata programme, working with all the major banking, energy and telecoms companies on an initiative to release personal data back to customers.

Alan challenges preconceptions and conventional wisdom on global branding, customer relationship and permission marketing. He sees the changes created by the new personal data landscape as this century’s big commercial opportunity. As individuals change the way they want to deal with organisations, how they make decisions and run their lives, it’s creating a ‘win win’ opportunity for consumers and businesses, but only those organisations positioned to respond will survive.

A former editor of Marketing Magazine, Alan is the founder and strategy director of a business researching and advising organisations on the implications of 'consumer empowerment’; how it will evolve, and what it means for organisations. He also founded a technology start-up helping to empower consumers in the management of personal data. He serves on the editorial boards of The Journal of Brand Management and The Journal of Direct, Digital and Database Marketing and has been a marketing correspondent for The Times and contributor to the Financial Times.

In presentations, Alan explores the difficulties companies face to combine their response to new technologies, personal data, and customer expectations with the need to put the human factor, trust and privacy at the heart of their business. He examines questions such as where next for social media, what does big data mean for businesses, and what do customers’ decisions really mean?

Alan looks at all the trends. He explores notions of ‘value for time’ as well as value for money, and branding as a recruiting sergeant for employees and business partners as well as customers. He also considers if being green is a cynical marketing ploy, a means of earning a licence to operate, or a doorway to new definitions of value and radically new business strategies.

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